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ABORIGINAL TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE AND SOURCE WATER PROTECTION - FIRST NATIONS' VIEWS ON TAKING CARE OF WATER

As provincial legislation pertaining to water is being proposed and federal strategies are being implemented, First Nations are voicing concern about not only their lack of input in these initiatives, but also the virtual absence of any cultural reference therein. The Chiefs of Ontario, in collaboration with Environment Canada, embarked on a project to capture some of the First Nations‘ traditional views on taking care of water, and how this knowledge can fit with current government source water protection plans.

SUMMARY REPORT ON FIRST NATIONS ROUNDTABLE

The provincial government is developing legislation to protect sources of drinking water for all of Ontario’s residents. Draft drinking water source protection legislation, released to the public in June 2004, proposes legislation provisions necessary for the development of source protection plans. The Ministry of Environment (MOE) has indicated that it will develop comprehensive legislation dealing with both the planning and implementation aspects of source protection after the considering advise of the Implementation and Technical Experts Committees.

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FINAL REPORT ON SURVEY OF GARBAGE DISPOSAL/BURNING IN FIRST NATION COMMUNITIES IN ONTARIO

The “uncontrolled burning of domestic-type trash, particularly in barrels and landfills, is a major source of chlorinated dioxins and furans and other toxic pollutants to the environment. Open burning takes place at low temperatures and lacks the pollution control devices required on municipal incinerators. Dioxins and furans have been linked to numerous adverse health effects such as; cancer, weakened immune system, reproductive disorders, allergies and asthma, skin diseases, etc.

RENEWING THE GREAT LAKES ACTION PLAN FOR THE YEAR 2000 - REPORT OF THE ONTARIO FIRST NATIONS DISCUSSION SESSION

This report documents the main points of discussion which arose during the course of a one-day workshop held in Toronto on September 20, 1999. The workshop took place in order to provide Ontario First Nations and Environment Canada representatives with the opportunity to discuss the federal government’s initiative for renewing the Great Lakes Action Plan for the year 2000.

WATER QUALITY IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO - AN ABORIGINAL KNOWLEDGE PERSPECTIVE

This submission provides an overview of what water means to Aboriginal people in Ontario. Emphasis is placed on the fact that such meaning has application in both historical and contemporary times.

RINKING WATER IN ONTARIO FIRST NATION COMMUNITIES - PRESENT CHALLENGES AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS FOR ON-RESERVE WATER TREATMENT IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO

Like all communities, potable water is vital to daily life in the 134 First Nation communities of Ontario. Water is also spiritually significant to members of these communities and important to many cultural practices. Aboriginal knowledge, often overlooked as a science by the rest of the western world, continues to positively inform the attitudes and practices of Ontario First Peoples, including in their stewardship of the water resources they share with the rest of Ontario’s residents.

SUMMARY REPORT OF CONTAMINANTS AND ENVIRONMENT HEALTH - A DISCUSSION GROUP FOR FIRST NATIONS IN ONTARIO

In early 2008, the National Aboriginal Health Organization (NAHO) and the First Nations Environmental Health Innovation Network (FNEHIN) discussed co-hosting a regional workshop on First Nations environmental health issues in Ontario. The First Nations Centre (FNC) at NAHO is one of nine founding partners of FNEHIN, and offered to host the workshop at their office in Ottawa. NAHO summer student Miguel Sioui coordinated the event with direction from both Julian Robbins (NAHO) and Tara Marsden (FNEHIN).

CANADA - ONTARIO AGREEMENT (DRAFT) - RESPECTING THE GREAT LAKES BASIN ECOSYSTEM

The purpose of the First Nations’ Workshop on the draft COA Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem was: (1) to provide an opportunity for First Nations’ representatives to learn more about the draft Agreement, to provide comments and to share their perspectives and (2) to examine potential mechanisms for collaboration with First Nations on Great Lakes issues and activities relating to the draft COA.

ONTARIO FIRST NATIONS PERSPECTIVES ON TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE - A DIAGNOSTIC AND DISCUSSION PAPER

While the practices and ways of life of Indigenous peoples have existed for thousands of years, the concept of traditional knowledge was only introduced by Western academics in the early 1980s. Most Indigenous peoples were not too concerned with academic exercises around defining and documenting traditional knowledge until issues of commercialization and bioprospecting came to their attention.

ABORIGINAL TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE AND SOURCE WATER PROTECTION FINAL REPORT

As provincial legislation pertaining to water is being proposed and federal strategies are being implemented, First Nations are voicing concern about not only their lack of input in these initiatives, but also the virtual absence of any cultural reference therein. The Chiefs of Ontario, in collaboration with Environment Canada, embarked on a project to capture some of the First Nations’ traditional views on taking care of water, and how this knowledge can fit with current government source water protection plans.

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